Space-Age Aerogel for Thermal Insulation: NASA Webinar June 19th

folded-aerogelOn Thursday, June 19th at 2pm EDT, companies in the thermal insulation industry have a chance to learn about a cutting-edge aerogel technology developed at NASA’s Glenn Research Center. This amazing polyimide material, which is available for license from NASA, offers significant improvements over silica-based aerogel. Learn more and access registration for the June 19th webinar here.

Now, when I say, “significant,” I mean huge improvements:

  • NASA Glenn’s aerogel is flexible without shedding particles — an unprecedented achievement in the field of aerogels.
  • This aerogel can withstand continuous temperatures of 250–300°C (~480–570°F) or spikes as high as 400°C (~750°F). Its thermal conductivity is a mere 14–20W/m-K.
  • It’s 10 times thinner while providing just as much thermal insulation as traditional silica aerogels.
  • Because the NASA polyimide aerogel is 500 times stronger than silica aerogels, you can use thick panels of it as structural insulation.
  • It can be formed into any configuration — molded shapes, thin films, tape — and applied to any object (e.g., wrapped around a pipe, sewn into fabric, molded to a panel).

Aerogel is practically lighter than air…. because it’s 90% air! This means it takes up less space and weight that traditional insulation or heat shield materials (fiberglass, wool, polyurethane foam, steel, ceramics) used in:

  • Industrial pipes, hoses (oil, gas)
  • Automobiles
  • Building insulation
  • Cryogenic tanks
  • Shipping containers for temperature-sensitive products (biomedical, pharmaceutical)
  • Protective clothing
  • Electronics (dielectrics)
  • Fuel cells and batteries
  • Optical sensors
  • And more

During the June 19th webinar, which is hosted by Tech Briefs Media Group, the inventor of this amazing material, Dr. Mary Ann Meador, will discuss the aerogel and its possible uses. Then Amy Hiltabidel of the Technology Transfer Office at NASA Glenn will discuss commercialization options for the aerogel.

If you’re in the thermal insulation industry, you won’t want to miss it! Register now to join NASA on Thursday, June 19th at 2:00pm EDT.

Share
Posted by Fuentek Staff

Comments are closed.