Tag Archives: University/Government Licensing-Key Insights

Collaborating with Universities/Government Labs: Free IRI “Brown Bag” Webinar

Register for IRI webinarThis Friday, March 4th at noon EST, the Industrial Research Institute (IRI) is focusing its 1-hour “Brown Bag” webinar on Collaborating with Universities and Government Labs. This is a great opportunity for companies to gain tips and useful resources for navigating the partnerships between industry and research institutions. And you don’t have to be a member of IRI to attend Friday’s webinar – it’s open to all. I’m pleased to be a panelist for this interactive, web-based discussion along with Dr. Richard Chylla of Michigan State University. Rich and I co-authored an article published in IRI’s bimonthly journal Research–Technology Management on this very topic. Our conversation on Friday will focus on how to pursue collaborations with academic and government organizations… Continue reading

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Putting Market Data to Work for Tech Transfer: Stories from the Field

BoyWithBinoculars_iStock_000058151110Gathering and analyzing market data may be at the heart of developing the technology transfer strategy, but its value is not limited to the go/no-go decision and planning how to move forward. There are some less obvious but extremely impactful ways that market data can be a useful tool for a tech transfer office (TTO). Here are four projects I’ve worked on recently that illustrate some of the powerful ways your TTO can make use of market data. Continue reading

Posted in Collaborative Research and Development, Competitive Intelligence, Licensing and Deal Making, Marketing Intellectual Property, Stories From the Field, Technology Commercialization Processes | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Putting Market Data to Work for Tech Transfer: Stories from the Field

Finding the Fit in Industry-University Collaborations: Advice for Companies

Richard W. ChyllaCo-authored by Laura A. Schoppe and Richard W. Chylla, Ph.D.

Collaboration between well-matched partners is a synergistic way for a company to enter a clearly defined, adjacent market based on breakthrough technology to achieve higher growth. University and government labs across the United States collectively represent a potentially useful partner, given that they have capabilities, expertise, and intellectual property (IP) portfolios that support commercial products. And because many of them are keen to partner with industry, they have been simplifying their policies and offering new programs to facilitate collaboration. Today’s blog post summarizes one such university program, and we provide specific advice for entering into discussions with potential collaborators… and knowing when it’s time to move on. Continue reading

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How-To Tips for Corporate Licensing Officers Looking for University/Government Technologies

Laura Schoppe's article "Cutting-Edge Tech: A How-To Guide for Corporate Licensing Officers" appeared in issue 67 of IAM magazineUniversities and government labs — especially in the United States — are keen to transfer technologies into commercial ventures. It can be tough, but not impossible, for corporates to engage with those organisations and find those innovations. So begins an article I was asked to write for Intellectual Asset Management (IAM) magazine. Entitled “Cutting-Edge Tech: A How-To Guide for Corporate Licensing Officers,” this article is now available for downloading from our In-Depth Insights page. Thanks, IAM, for granting reprint permission.Continue reading

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Change the IRS’s “Private Use in Bonded Facilities” Regulation

IRS_iStock_000017797441SmallI wish to offer an answer to the RFI’s third Overarching Question: What specific actions can the Federal Government take to build and sustain U.S. strengths including its entrepreneurial culture, flexible labor markets, world-class research universities, strong regional innovation ecosystems, and large share of global venture capital investment? My answer: Change Section 6.02 of Revenue Procedure 2007-47 (from IRB 2007-29 issued on July 16, 2007) regarding corporate-sponsored research so as to better ensure that such innovative R&D occurs in U.S. universities rather than overseas. This change can serve as a no-cost solution that can have a positive impact on local/regional economies without creating a financial burden on the federal government or on U.S. taxpayers. Continue reading

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Universities’ Shifting View of IP in SRAs

Laura's fellow panelists (l to r): Kevin Wozniak, Holly Meadows, and Carla Lema TomeLast week I was invited to participate on a panel at the 2014 AUTM® national meeting. The focus: How university technology transfer offices (TTOs) are shifting their view of intellectual property (IP) terms when securing R&D funding through sponsored research agreements (SRAs). My fellow panelists and I discussed the current models at various universities. Here’s an overview. Continue reading

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Navigating the Nuances of Complex Collaborative University-Industry Partnerships: Key Best Practices

iStock_000016133531XSmallOver the past several years, I have noticed an emerging trend in university-industry partnerships, and it has begun to create new challenges for technology transfer professionals. Companies are beginning to forge ever more complex collaborations with universities and university consortia while relying less often on the more standard agreements, such as sponsored research agreements (SRAs) and material transfer agreements (MTAs). These collaborations may…. Continue reading

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Streamlined/Low-Cost Licensing: Making Sure Faster and Cheaper Are Better

Sealing the deal with time to spareI read with interest two recent news stories about technology transfer offices (TTOs) looking to increase licensing deals by addressing two oft-cited barriers: high costs and long negotiation times. The logic: Offering intellectual property (IP) at a super low cost (or even for free) and/or through non-negotiation, ready-to-sign license agreements will result in more technologies getting to market faster. These types of programs have been around for a bit (see my prior posts about free IP and ready-to-sign licenses) and the trend seems to be growing. So let’s look at the two recent examples and consider how to make these types of programs successful. Continue reading

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Free IP Circumvents the Nickel-and-Dime’ing in SRAs

Nickel-and-dime'ingThere have been a lot of articles recently about universities giving away IP rights for free. The specifics of each vary, and most seem to have advantages that will help accelerate the transfer of technology. But some go further than others. Continue reading

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Questions Raised by “Free Agency” Tech Transfer Provisions in Startup Act

There’s been a lot of discussion among universities and others about the inclusion of the “free agency” concept in Section 7 of the Moran–Warner Startup Act. This is the idea proposed by the Kauffman Foundation to allow professors to choose their own agents to help transfer their technology rather than be tied to their home university’s technology transfer office (TTO). This post is not about the merits of the idea. I’m writing this post to point out some key questions that need to be answered for such a plan to be realistically implemented. Continue reading

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